Health Standards in the Tzrif

THE IMPORTANCE OF STANDARDS

  • Parental concern: We must alleviate our parents’ natural concern for the health and safety of their children.
  • Camper insecurity: Many campers are apprehensive at being away from home and family. Being ill or injured increases this apprehension.
  • Camper mood: A campers’ health directly affects his/her general attitude about camp and enjoyment of the summer. No one is happy being ill or injured.

Keeping our campers (and staff!) safe and healthy is our primary concern!!

GENERAL ISSUES

GOOD HYGIENE

Staff must ensure that their campers:

  • Bathe regularly & wash their hair
  • Brush teeth regularly
  • Wash hands before meals and after using the bathroom
  • Change clothes regularly (especially underwear and socks) Change linens weekly
  • Only use their own toiletries, towels, etc.

NUTRITION

Staff must:

  • Model good eating habits – including a balanced diet Make sure campers avoid the excessive consumption of junk food 
  • Use separate serving utensils in the Chadar Ochel (Dining Room).

ADEQUATE REST

Staff must:

    • Be sure that you and your campers receive adequate sleep at night and wake up rested. One needs enough rest to have adequate energy to participate in camp activities and to manage a bunk’s worth of campers. One’s immunity is affected by inadequate sleep.

HOUSEKEEPING

Staff must:

    • Be sure the bathroom is kept clean and that plumbing works. Report any plumbing problems immediately.
    • Sweep floors regularly
    • Be sure there are no open food containers in the tzrif – this can attract bugs, mice, or other vermin.
    • Be sure campers sleep “head-to-foot.”
    • Watch bunk conditions. (For example – close windows in the evening during cold or rain.)

ACCIDENT PREVENTION

Staff must:

  • Report any potential hazards where campers could trip easily, get cut, etc.
  • Keep floors clear of objects to prevent falls.
  • Be sure campers are wearing proper footwear at all times. Campers are not permitted to go barefoot. Flip-flops are
    not appropriate for most sports & activities.

DISEASE AND ILLNESS

OBSERVATION OF CAMPERS

  • Is the camper wearing appropriate attire. (Ex. Wearing long sleeves and long pants on cold mornings; wearing a raincoat or poncho for rain.)
  • Staff may notice a camper’s loss of interest in activities before a camper realizes s/he is ill.

EXCESSIVE HEAT

  • Increase water intake
  • Decrease Strenuous Activities
  • Observe campers for fatigue
  • Wear a hat
  • Apply sun screen

RAIN

  • Wear suitable clothes and footwear
  • Remove wet clothes as soon as possible
  • Allow clothes and footwear to dry completely before re- wearing them to prevent fungal diseases and skin allergies.

TICKS

  • Ensure your campers conduct tick checks daily.
  • Wear appropriate protection before hikes in the woods. 
  • Any imbedded ticks should not be removed. Bring the camper or staff member to the Marp for removal.

MOSQUITOES

  • Mosquito-borne illnesses like Eastern Equine encephalatis and West Nile virus require staff to be vigilant about getting campers to use bug spray and put on long pants & long sleeves at times when mosquitos are most active — for example, around an evening campfire.

UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS

  • Use gloves and other barriers when dealing with blood or other bodily fluids. 

SELF-CARE

  • Do not let your guard down regarding your body and your health.